top of page

Ada Sagi

75

Ada Sagi is a loving mother of three and grandmother to six. Born to parents who fled Poland, Ada’s journey began in Tel Aviv. There she pursued a career in education, teaching both Arabic and Hebrew, and eventually leading a regional school in southern Israel. A respected figure in Kibbutz Nir Oz, Ada is known for her contributions as an educator, passionate about peace and coexistence. Ada's life is a testament to her belief in dialogue as the key to living together in harmony, earning her recognition for her resilience, empathy, and advocacy for peace and justice.
The tranquility of Ada's life was shattered on the morning of October 7, 2023, during Simchat Torah, when Kibbutz Nir Oz, alongside other southern Israeli communities, fell victim to a brutal assault perpetrated by terrorists from the Gaza Strip. This assault targeted innocent civilians, disrupting their serene existence with unparalleled violence.
Initially, Ada's fate was uncertain, with only findings of bloodstains in her destroyed home... But the blood was that of a terrorist. It was her son, Noam Sagi, who, through online materials and reports, pieced together the dreadful fact of his mother's kidnapping.
Ada's ordeal began with her abduction by Palestinian Islamic Jihad terrorists, leading to a harrowing journey into Gaza. Initially transported on a motorcycle, squeezed between two terrorists, she suffered burns from the motorcycle's exhaust. The journey continued by car, where she was accompanied by Merav Tal, aged 53. The two women found themselves in a massive triage tent by 10:10, alongside 83-year-old Oded Lifshitz, who had suffered a gunshot wound. There, a terrorist conducted check-ins, inquiring about their personal details for documentation purposes.

In Khan Younis, Ada and Merav were subjected to a physical examination by the terrorists to remove alleged "chips," following which they were transferred to an apartment. The terrorist assigned to guard them claimed a daily compensation of 70 shekels per day for each captive. During her captivity, Ada was tormented by concerns about her children's awareness of her plight, distressed by the terrorists' assertions that Nir Oz no longer existed, leaving her uncertain of the reality in Israel.
Ada's appearance in a video posted by the Islamic Jihad organization marked a poignant moment of her captivity. She was coerced into stating her identity and expressing her longing for her family, under the directive of a terrorist. Furthermore, the terrorist demanded that she appeal to Minister Benny Gantz and urge him not to join a government with Prime Minister Netanyahu.
Throughout their harrowing experience, Ada and Merav found solace and strength in each other's company, despite their differences. Their bond, humorously referred to as a mix of 'Survivor,' 'Big Brother,' (Merav) and 'Channel 8,' (Ada) highlighted their resilience and mutual support.
The moment of separation from Elad Katzir (47), a friend from Nir Oz, whom Ada met during her captivity, underscored the uncertainty and fear that permeated their captivity, with their captors denying them a chance to say farewell, hinting at another undisclosed location for male captives.
Blindfolded and driven for hours, Ada, Merav, and later joined by 84-year-old Ditza Heiman, experienced profound uncertainty until they arrived at Nasser Hospital. There, the emotional reunion with Yigal Yaakov (13), a young member of their community and the son of Merav’s partner, Yair Yaakov, brought tears, laughter, and a deep sense of relief and connection. “The image of Merav and Yigal embracing, both crying, yelling, and laughing, is unforgettable.” Ada shared. The next day, Ofelia Roitman (77), Ada’s close friend from Nir Oz, joined them in the little room at the hospital.

On the day of her release from captivity, one of the terrorists said to Ada, "See you next year." To this, she commented, "The fact that I didn't kick him in a strategic spot, shows that I'm made of steel. I hope he's no longer among us. I truly once believed in peace, but never beyond the fence... One of the terrorists asked why I know Arabic, I told him 'because I thought we could make peace with you. Now I know we can't.”
Ada endured 53 days in the Palestinian Islamic Jihad's captivity in Gaza, a period marked by uncertainty and anguish for her, her family and her community. She was finally released as part of a temporary ceasefire agreement in late November.
Choosing not to return to Kibbutz Nir Oz after living there for 55 years, Ada has made a painful decision informed by too many losses and the shattered sense of security and trust that once grounded her life there. “My feelings are terribly mixed. I feel like I've lost my country.” Ada shares in an interview from March 2024 to N12 news. “After spending 53 days there, the chance that someone else could survive another 110 days... are we already past that point? (yes, unimaginably sad to say we are, C.H.S team) It's virtually zero.”
Once a devoted believer in the possibility of peace, her experience has hardened her heart against those who brutally attacked her people and held her hostage. Reflecting on her ordeal, Ada's perspective on peace and reconciliation has shifted dramatically, influenced by the trauma and insights gained during her captivity.
Ada's concern primarily revolves around the potential future innocent victims. "This is my greatest fear: who is going to be the next victim," Ada somberly concluded, reflecting on the looming threat that continues to haunt her and her community.

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

Message

From

date

We kindly ask you to leave your messages accordingly. 

By contributing messages or images, you agree to our Terms and Conditions.

Show them your support

Your message has been sent.

Thank you for your support!

Upload your message from the book / photo
write your message of support here. . .

bottom of page